La Mitad Del Mundo

Michael's Semester in Quito, Ecuador.

Comiendo Gusanos!

Last day of presentations.  I’m going to miss these kiddies.  We’ve gone through a lot this semester.

Chasing the sun

Somehow I survived the gigantic workload that was thrust upon me these last few weeks, and as of my last presentation monday I am free!  These weeks have had me staying in and working so much, but it was very fulfilling to see the semester work come together.  Now that they are done, there’s a rush for me to hang out and say bye to the people who have made this journey so special.  It amazes me how close I’ve grown with some people here, and Im going to miss them terribly when I have to leave.  Though, like my host mother says, its not goodbye forever because I will return.  I really believe that I will find myself here again, because it feels like a second home. So cheers to a wonderful semester, and I will be making the most of the farra these last few days, each night chasing the sun.

One of my favorite moments of my time here was visiting Mitad Del Mundo.  It’s a cool feeling knowing that you are standing on Earth’s sunny equator just outside of Quito.  It was also very fulfilling because when I was last abroad we took a day trip just outside of London to Greenwich to visit the prime meridian. Having the chance to straddle earth’s most important lines of latitude and longitude makes my abroad experiences come full circle.

Just a few weeks left

It is nearing the end of April, and so the school year is winding down, and my semester abroad is winding down.  There are many assignments, presentations, exams, and final projects that lie ahead of me.  It is actually quite overwhelming.  It has taken a lot of will power to cut down on fun activities and focus on schoolwork.  This weekend, I have an extra large workload as I was sick for most of this week.  I got food poisoning on Monday, which has made the week very difficult to manage.  At my lowest point, I was too uncomfortable to stand, and too uncomfortable to lie down, I just wanted out.  Somehow, I made it through, and I’m feeling a lot better now, ready to take on these last few weeks.  

At the helm.

TRANSITIONAL ZONE
The transitional zone is characterized by trees and shrubs that take advantage of the increased water availability.  Giant tortoises inhabit this area, and it is also used for agricultural purposes.

LITTORAL ZONE

The Littoral Zone is the coastline where habitats include, beaches, rocky shores, and mangroves. This habitat is ideal for seabirds, waterbirds, and shorebirds as well as plant species that can tolerate high salinity.

The Cromwell current is responsible for the cold upwellings that come from the west.  It is a counter current that runs from the western Pacific beneath the flows of water traveling west.  It brings up water rich in nutrients and it disperses at it reaches the submarine Galápagos platform and rises up around Fernandina and Isabela islands.
A similar phenomenon occurs from the south east, with the peruvian currents bringing cold nutrient rich water to the Galápagos.  
The Panama current is a warm water currents that travels down from Central America.

The Cromwell current is responsible for the cold upwellings that come from the west.  It is a counter current that runs from the western Pacific beneath the flows of water traveling west.  It brings up water rich in nutrients and it disperses at it reaches the submarine Galápagos platform and rises up around Fernandina and Isabela islands.

A similar phenomenon occurs from the south east, with the peruvian currents bringing cold nutrient rich water to the Galápagos.  

The Panama current is a warm water currents that travels down from Central America.

SCALEZIA ZONE
The Scalezia Zone is lush cloud forest like vegetacion that is dominated by the scalezia trees.  Scalezia ia an endemic plant to the Galápagos.  It is a tree species that grows 15-20 meters high. It grows in stands where all the trees are of the same age.